The White Lady by Joe Janicki

Splash! For the first time in a couple of hours my eyes are actually wide open. As a paralyzing shiver rolls through each and every one of my veins, I ask myself, why am I not on my boat? Why don’t I have a drink in my hand? Just a moment ago I was partying my brains out with people I consider my best friends, alongside the closest thing that I have MACALLANfound to true love in the past 7 years, which I pay through the nose for—sometimes literally. In all directions, except for one, I see nothing but darkness. In the direction of the coast, I can see lights. We must be 5 miles, give or take, from the harbor. Man, is it freezing! What the hell happened? I must have leaned back a little too far on the railing along the starboard side of the bottom deck. Cigar in one hand, drink in another. Shit. The yacht is not turning around. Nobody saw me. They couldn’t have. They were all two stories above me while I was enjoying a few moments alone. Continue reading

Suburbiaville by Kyle Cabrera

Suburbiaville by Kyle Cabrera

Every time I think about the events that led up to the last time I saw Martin I become sick.  Now that I am an adult I know why it happened, but when I was a child his disappearance left me confused.  In history class, the week before he left, our third grade teacher was lecturing about the Second American Civil War.  Most of our history books cover the Second American Civil War extensively, but little is said about the first American Civil War, except that it ended in a tie inspiring a brief period of compromise.   Our teacher stood in front of the class and asked if anyone knew the names of the two armies that fought each other.

“Us,” a student replied without raising his hand.

“Yes, and who do you mean by us?”  The teacher replied.

“The Tea Party,” he said confidently.

The teacher smiled.  “Does any one know the name of the army that fought the Tea Party?”

A boy in the front raised his hand. “The blue-bellies.” Continue reading